Philosophy News in Brief March 5th 2017

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Philosophy Is A Great Major, New Website Promises

Image Credit: Patch.

Philosophy still a “great major”

According to Patch, an oft labelled “useless, pretentious, counterproductive, ridiculous and self-indulgent” undergraduate major might have a strong defender.

As per a new website, created and maintained by Jack Weinstein, professor of philosophy at the University of North Dakota, argues that philosophy continues to be a “great major.”

On the front page, it says, “Philosophy is a great degree to help you get your first job…It’s a fabulous degree to help you get your second, fifth, and eighth.”

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Image Credit: UW-Stevens Point.

New course incorporates video games into philosophy

Stevens Point Journal reports that many video games such as “Bioshock Infinite,” “The Legend of Zelda,” and “The Walking Dead” are not only popular activities for younger people.

In fact, they can even be used to teach how they “influence thoughts, morals and decision-making.”  The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is offering a course entitled “Video Games and Philosophy.”

This will be offered to high school students, or those of that age, “to both play and think critically about popular video games…Campers will develop argumentative, rhetorical and logical skills to become better at written and oral communication.”

Image Credit: A.V. Club.

The philosophy of Westworld, robot rights and more

According to the A.V. Club, Westworld is great, enjoyable science fiction with many layers of philosophical debates. It looks at the nature of consciousness, free will, and so on, in between in its many shootout scenes.

One main question, for example, is “whether the park’s hosts should be thought of as sentient.” Another is the “debate between predestination and free will.” Do we have a choice in guiding our destiny, or not?

What does that mean for morality? As well, the show’s philosophical bent looks at the nature of consciousness and free will as they relate to suffering. Do we need suffering for consciousness or free will?

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About Author

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Scott Douglas Jacobsen is the Founder of In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal and In-Sight Publishing. Jacobsen works for science and human rights, especially women’s and children’s rights. He considers the modern scientific and technological world the foundation for the provision of the basics of human life throughout the world and advancement of human rights as the universal movement among peoples everywhere.

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